Reviews for The Prince of the Pagodas

  1. Joseph Caley as the Salamander Prince with Artists of Birmingham Royal Ballet. Photo: Bill Cooper

    Birmingham Royal Ballet - The Prince of the Pagodas - London Coliseum

    Lise Smith, Monday 31 March 2014 — Performance: 26 - 29 March 2014

    Admired but never quite embraced by audiences, The Prince of The Pagodas has what can only be described as an awkward performance history. First commissioned in 1957 by Royal Ballet founder Dame Ninette de Valoi… Continue Reading

  2. Birmingham Royal Ballet - The Prince of the Pagodas - London Coliseum

    Press Review 3Neil Norman, Daily Express, Friday 28 March 2014Performance 26 - 29 March 2014

    BRB’s David Bintley tries his best to make choreographic sense of the music and succeeds better than many but it’s a wonky work, with stunning passages undermined by longeurs and cliched sequences where his inventiveness fails him due to the lack of musical… 

  3. Birmingham Royal Ballet - The Prince of the Pagodas - London Coliseum

    Press Review 3Lyndsey Winship, Evening Standard, Thursday 27 March 2014Performance 26 - 29 March 2014

    Stars of the show: a sassy octopus, four dancing seahorses and everything touched by the hand of designer Rae Smith. Come for the luscious visuals, forget about the silly storyline — it’s that sort of ballet.  

  4. Birmingham Royal Ballet - The Prince of the Pagodas - London Coliseum

    Press Review Hanna Weibye, artsdesk, Thursday 27 March 2014Performance 26 - 29 March 2014

    Britten’s often delicate orchestration always seems best set off by just one or two sets of limbs. The best variations are for a series of effeminate yet animalistic male characters, the King of the East, the Prince as Salamander,the Seahorses and the spiny Deep-Sea … 

  5. Birmingham Royal Ballet - The Prince of the Pagodas - London Coliseum

    Press Review 3Clement Crisp, Financial Times, Thursday 27 March 2014Performance 26 - 29 March 2014

    Bintley’s Pagodas is dragged along by its score, and the choreographer’s skills are chained both to the original narrative (which Bintley adapts but cannot cure) and to dances that must go on because Britten does.  

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