News: Dancing in a Shaking World

Tuesday 27 October 2009

A six month collaboration between ResCen – the Centre for Research into Creation in the Performing Arts at Middlesex University and Beijing Dance Academy, widely known as the ‘cradle’ of China’s dance artists, is leading to performances of *Dancing in a Shaking World*, at the Poly Theatre, Beijing next week on 6 & 7 November 2009.

Three UK based choreographers Shobana Jeyasingh, Jonathan Lunn and Kerry Nichols worked with some of China’s leading dancers from the Beijing Dance Academy’s company, alongside four Chinese choreographers and one from Hong Kong/Australia. The choreographic brief was designed to test Stravinsky’s proposition that the artist finds more freedom through the challenge of restricting rules, a concept which resonates with the Chinese character for ‘crisis’ which contains a symbol for ‘danger’ combined with one for ‘opportunity’. The choreographers were set the challenge of ‘the box’, the construct of a fixed creative period of 12 days, a maximum performance allowance of 10 minutes, the use of up to 6 dancers and the requirement to address the concept of ‘dancing in a shaking world’.

The resulting programme of dance united by one theme – the power of dance to address a rapidly changing world – and lighting designed by Charles Balfour and Ren Dongshen. It promises a range of insights into choreographic process and the artist’s vision of the contemporary world.

The performances on 6 and 7 November will be followed by a conference on 8 November at the Beijing Dance Academy featuring presentations in progress as academics discuss and test their perceptions and observations of the creative processes that have informed/formed the performance.

_*Dancing in a Shaking World is* _part of DANSCROSS – a long-term collaborative initiative involving the Beijing Dance Academy and ResCen at Middlesex University.
Dance writer Donald Hutera is in Beijing to report on the project. Read his blog

Find out more about the project at: http://rescen.net/blog/

and the Chinese version: http://blog.sina.com.cn/danscross

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